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Recommended

Lodging:

Beaver Valley Inn

Lew Beach, New York

Ph. 845-439-4844

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The 1880 House

Bed & Breakfast

Pulaski, New York

Ph. 315-298-6088

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Kettle Creek Lodge

Cross Fork, PA

Ph. 315-298-6088

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Guides:

Ray's Guide Service

Guide: Ray Ellis

Fishing the Salmon River

Salmon & Trout

Pulaski, New York

Ph. 315-298-7575

Email: Wogiewus@aol.com

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Other:

The Wulff School of Fly Fishing

P.O. Box 984, Livingston Manor, New York

Ph. 845-439-5020

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Articles:                                                           Read other articles

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Fly fishing Tips for Air Travel

Some tips to get your gear there and back safely

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Orson Welles once wrote, "There are only two emotions on a plane: boredom and terror".  Fortunately, these emotions have improved slightly.  However, the feeling of terror remains when faced with placing your prized reels on a conveyor belt headed for the black-drape abyss.

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Provided below are tips or a "strategy" I used successfully on a recent fly fishing trip to Ireland.

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Travel Tips (Each is explained in its entirety below):

Check the TSA and your air carrier for the latest travel details

Pre-pack your gear

Carry your rods, reels, flies and camera on-board

Check your waders and boots

Combine things: put two rods in one rod tube, two tippet spools in one

Dry boots by your hotel AC/heater, pack trash bags

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Check travel details:

Check both the TSA.gov (Transportation Security Administration) and your air carrier's website before getting too far into your travel plans.  Rules provided by your air carrier will likely overrule TSA's rules; however, both will provide good starting points for determining what you carry on board.

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TSA's view on fishing rods: "Fishing Rods are permitted as carry-on and checked baggage.  However, please check with your air carrier to confirm that it fits within their size limitations for carry-on items. Ultimately, it is the carrier's decision as to whether or not it can be transported as carry-on baggage".

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TSA's view on fishing tackle: "Fishing equipment should be placed in your checked baggage.  Some tackle equipment can be considered sharp and dangerous.  Expensive reels or fragile tackle such as fly's should be packed in your carry-on baggage".

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TSA's view on luggage locks: "TSA screens every passenger's baggage before it is placed on an airplane. While our technology allows us to electronically screen bags, there are times when we need to physically inspect a piece of luggage. TSA has worked with several companies to develop locks that can be opened by security officers using universal "master" keys so that the locks may not have to be cut. These locks are available at airports and travel stores nationwide".

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My air carrier was Continental Airlines.  Their policy at the time (June, 2007) was the following: one bag (< 40 lbs.), one personal item (< 51 linear inches), and one small personal item such as a brief case or camera case.  I met their rules by checking one luggage bag and carrying on one rod tube and a backpack.

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Pre-pack gear:

You would pre-pack your gear for any other big fishing trip, why would this be any different?  When I say "pre-pack", I mean lay your gear out in a logical arrangement prior to your trip.  Think about what you'll need and then re-pack your gear, paying particular attention to what pocket you care to have your clippers, weight, and tippet in.  The more time you spend pre-packing, the less likely you'll forget something.  This time can also be used to determine what you'll really need, and if your gear falls within the weight limits expressed by your air carrier.

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Carry-on items:

It's recommended to carry on expensive items such as cameras, reels, rods, and flies.  You'll have the most control over these items if they remain in your possession at all times.  Consider placing two rods in one rod tube.  For my trip, I placed two four-piece rods (5 and 9 weight) in one 33 inch GLoomis triangular tube.  I used my backpack for my cameras, reels, and flies.

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Checked items:

Your waders and boots can be checked.  At some point, you need to draw the line with what you can physically carry on board.  While waders and boots are important, you can fish without them.  Most fly fishing travel destinations have places where you could buy or rent boots and waders if needed.

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I used a Simms roller bag for my trip.  The bag had two large compartments, one for clothing and one for waders, and was separated by a moisture barrier.  The bag was nearly 32.5 inches high, which was tall enough for me to stow my 33-inch rod tube diagonally.  This allowed me to carry a 10-foot rod in my bag while traveling in taxis and on the train.  I hand-carried the rod tube once on the plane.

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Combine and Consolidate:

Reduce items whenever possible -- this reduces both weight and clutter.  Examples include buying two tippet spools of the same poundage and winding one onto the other.  For my trip I combined two spools of 8 pound Seaguar fluorocarbon (25 yd capacity) on one spool.  I did the same for 10 pound.

Also, combing two rods in one rod tube is also possible.

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Wading boots:

A little wading boot forethought can make your trip more enjoyable.  First, do you really need boots or will wading sandals work instead?  For short trips or trips with limited stream walking, sandals may be a better option.  Sandals dry quicker and are lighter.  Remember your wading boots will get heavy once wet -- this may cause your bag to exceed your air carrier's specified bag weight limit.  One way to reduce this is to dry your boots by the hotel's AC/heating vents the night before your return voyage.  Also, packing trash bags to place your wet boots or sandals into assures the rest of your gear remains dry.

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Lastly, pack early and enjoy your trip!

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